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Bright Futures of Bardia

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HAPPY NEW YEAR to our Nepali friends and family. May your new year be filled with joy and prosperity for you and your family.

Not from Nepal and curious about why new year is celebrated now you may find this useful...

On the Nepali Calendar, Nepal Sambat (“Nepali New Year’s Day”) comes at the beginning of the lunar month called “Navavarsha”.

It generally occurs between April 11th and 15th on the Gregorian Calendar.

While Nepal uses a solar calendar with fixed dates for most purposes, it reserves the traditional lunar calendar for religious festivals, birthdays, and “death anniversaries.”

Nepali New Year is an official public holiday in Nepal, which is celebrated with parades, feasts, and family reunions. Since Nepali New Year is seen as a deeply religious holiday, various religious rites and a hope for blessings in the year ahead are a big part of the holiday’s meaning.

The Nepali Era, which is based on the use of the Nepali Calendar, began in A.D. 879, and the dates of this era are found on old Nepali coins, stone and copper inscriptions, and official writings.

Due to the deeply ingrained traditions of Nepal’s more than 60 ethnic groups, there are actually nine different New Years’ Days in Nepal. They are all celebrated, but Nepal Sambat is considered the “national New Year,” bringing some semblance of unity in the midst of great linguistic, cultural, and historical diversity.

Many Nepalese go out on picnics in local parks on Nepali New Year or travel around to see different parts of the country. Many families also gather together to eat festive meals and enjoy each other’s company. There is much joy as the whole nations unites to welcome in the new year.

Colourful decorations appear on both public and private buildings, and there are streets dances, parades, traditional games and sports activities, youth pageants and contests, and more. Gifts and greeting cards are exchanged by many, and new year’s resolutions are made. Students plan out the year’s studies on this day, and everyone takes time to reflect on what lies behind and what lies ahead.

In Hindu Temples across Nepal, many gather for morning prayer sessions and to worship and offer food offerings to the gods. The faithful then circle the temple counter-clockwise and ring bells as they go.
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HAPPY NEW YEAR to our Nepali friends and family. May your new year be filled with joy and prosperity for you and your family.

Not from Nepal and curious about why new year is celebrated now you may find this useful...

On the Nepali Calendar, Nepal Sambat (“Nepali New Year’s Day”) comes at the beginning of the lunar month called “Navavarsha”.

It generally occurs between April 11th and 15th on the Gregorian Calendar. 

While Nepal uses a solar calendar with fixed dates for most purposes, it reserves the traditional lunar calendar for religious festivals, birthdays, and “death anniversaries.” 

Nepali New Year is an official public holiday in Nepal, which is celebrated with parades, feasts, and family reunions. Since Nepali New Year is seen as a deeply religious holiday, various religious rites and a hope for blessings in the year ahead are a big part of the holiday’s meaning.

The Nepali Era, which is based on the use of the Nepali Calendar, began in A.D. 879, and the dates of this era are found on old Nepali coins, stone and copper inscriptions, and official writings.

Due to the deeply ingrained traditions of Nepal’s more than 60 ethnic groups, there are actually nine different New Years’ Days in Nepal. They are all celebrated, but Nepal Sambat is considered the “national New Year,” bringing some semblance of unity in the midst of great linguistic, cultural, and historical diversity.

Many Nepalese go out on picnics in local parks on Nepali New Year or travel around to see different parts of the country. Many families also gather together to eat festive meals and enjoy each other’s company. There is much joy as the whole nations unites to welcome in the new year. 

Colourful decorations appear on both public and private buildings, and there are streets dances, parades, traditional games and sports activities, youth pageants and contests, and more. Gifts and greeting cards are exchanged by many, and new year’s resolutions are made. Students plan out the year’s studies on this day, and everyone takes time to reflect on what lies behind and what lies ahead.

In Hindu Temples across Nepal, many gather for morning prayer sessions and to worship and offer food offerings to the gods. The faithful then circle the temple counter-clockwise and ring bells as they go.

It won’t be long now until we get the roof on our new science and technology block and the kids can have super dry classrooms to study in.

What a difference that will make for the coming wet season!

Our next phase is the upper 5 classrooms on the yellow block next door to this new building.

If you are able to support us to bring that to reality please reach out via DM.

We will be launching our campaign soon.

❤️❤️
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It won’t be long now until we get the roof on our new science and technology block and the kids can have super dry classrooms to study in. 

What a difference that will make for the coming wet season!

Our next phase is the upper 5 classrooms on the yellow block next door to this new building.

If you are able to support us to bring that to reality please reach out via DM.

We will be launching our campaign soon.

❤️❤️Image attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

Looks amazing! Well done

Well done 🙏

so exciting

Now April 2021. The vision becomes real. 🙏🏻 ... See MoreSee Less

This was taken in April 2019.
Demolition of old unsafe bamboo and mud with the belief that we could raise funds to build these kids a classroom block conducive to learning.

In the next post is where we are now in April 2021 and things are looking good with works well and truly in full swing.
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Comment on Facebook

If you don’t know what the Holi festival is... read here: www.stunningnepal.com/holi-festival-in-nepal/

HAPPY HOLI❤️🙏 🙏🙏

Happy movement

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